Conversations with James Salter 

Conversations with James Salter (University Press of Mississippi) collects interviews published from 1972 to 2014 with the award-winning author of The Hunters, A Sport and a Pastime, Light Years and All That Is. Gathered here are his earliest interviews following acclaimed early novels, conversations covering his work as a screenwriter and award-winning director, and interviews charting his explosive popularity after publishing All That Is, his first novel after a gap of thirty-four years. These conversations chart Salter's progression as a writer, his love affair with France, his military past as a fighter pilot, and his lyrical explorations of gender relations.

The collection contains interviews from Sweden, Chile, France, and Argentina appearing for the first time in English. Included as well are published conversations from the United States, Canada and Australia, some of which are significantly extended versions, giving this collection an international scope of Salter's wide-ranging career and his place in world literature.
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Even when brilliant, novels seldom reveal themselves as both revelatory and revolutionary. Elena Ferrante's mesmeric Neapolitan series promises to become such a literary touchstone, and hers a deserving addition to the list of canonical names.
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Published in time to honor the centenary of Walker Percy's birth, this collection of essays is the first to focus solely on his National Book Award-winning debut novel, The Moviegoer. From Louisiana State University Press in April 2016.
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Certain writers possess obsessions they thread through their works in kaleidoscopic patterns: Franz Kafka's alienation in a bureaucratic world, Ann Patchett's disparate souls who come together to form family. William Faulkner's crumbling Old South. Siri Hustvedt, acclaimed author of What I Loved, maintains as her focus sexual identity and how it affects perception, a subject we might be lulled into imagining is obsolete.
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In Muse, a charming novel that evolves from gossipy elegy for the glory days of New York publishing into literary mystery and prognosis of the future of the book, legendary Farrar, Straus and Giroux editor and poet Jonathan Galassi has created the most astounding American literary figure who never lived. 
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Elizabeth McCracken's first book of fiction in thirteen years, Thunderstruck and Other Stories, reads as full and nuanced as a collection of novels. In each story, she distills a scenario to its concentrated essence, akin to offering a ladle of water that contains the depth and variety of the expansive lake from which she draws.
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Few writers have experienced a wilder roller coaster of adulation, neglect and resuscitation than Austrian novelist and biographer Stefan Zweig. In the 1920s and '30s, he became the most widely translated author in the world, and his lecture, whether at Carnegie Hall or across South America, drew thousands. Yet merely a decade after his 1942 suicide in exile, his name slipped from the common consciousness of English speakers.
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